New Zealand Travel – See the South Island

Most people start their South Island holiday In Christchurch. I’d like to suggest an alternative. How about flying into Wellington. That may sound crazy, but it allows you to catch the Interislander ferry across to Picton, which is a great way to start your holiday. As you approach Picton you travel through the Marlborough Sounds, and you will get a much better look at them from the ferry than you would by road. You then collect your hire car from Picton and commence your journey at the top of the South Island, which means you won’t need to backtrack over the same ground.

My suggestion for a 15 day trip is:

Day 1 fly to Wellington. Stay in the city or the Oriental Bay area so that you have a short trip to the ferry the next morning.

2. Wellington to Picton on a morning ferry (about 4 hours). Then collect your hire car at Picton and drive to Kaikoura (about 2 hours). You travel along the coast for most of the journey. The Kaikoura Range comes down to the sea and depending on the time of year there may be plenty of snow still.

3. Go whale watching in the morning in Kaikoura before the winds start, then drive to Hanmer Springs (about 2 hours). Visit the thermal pools in Hanmer. A lovely clean, alpine resort.

4. Hanmer to Christchurch (about 2 hours)

5. Christchurch

6. Drive from Christchurch to Lake Tekapo (about 3 hours) and stay the night (try for a lake view room. The scenery is amazing).

7. Drive from Tekapo to Queenstown (3.5 hours). Spend four nights in Queenstown. There is plenty to do and see, and four days is my recommended minimum time here. Try and book a lake view room if you can.

8 to 10 Stay in Queenstown. This will give you a chance to relax for a few days, although you should plan a bus trip to Milford Sound on one of these days (and a bungy if you are game). The trip to Milford Sound is a big day, but at least someone else is doing the driving. A trip on the old steamship TSS Earnslaw is also recommended as is a trip up to Bob’s Peak on the gondola.

11. Drive from Queenstown to Wanaka. Make sure you travel over the Crown Range rather than through Cromwell, as it’s shorter and has better scenery (about 1 hour). About 20 kilometres before Wanaka stop of at the old Cardrona Hotel for morning tea or lunch. Stay the night in Wanaka. The scenery is similar to Queenstown, but the town is less hurried. A beautiful spot on the shores of Lake Wanaka. Visit Puzzling World while in Wanaka.

12. Drive from Wanaka to Franz Josef Glacier (about 4 hours). Spectacular scenery past endless lakes and then to the West Coast which is wild and rugged. Better to stay at Franz Josef rather than Fox Glacier as FJ has more variety in accommodation and places to eat. And you can see the glacier from the centre of the village. New Zealand weather can change quickly, but if the weather and funds allow, take a helicopter flight on to the glacier. Unbelievable!

13. Drive from Franz Josef to Punakaiki to visit Pancake Rocks and the blowhole. Not much else there other than a small village, but there is a motel called the Rocks Resort which is beachfront. We have stayed there a few times. The rooms look over the ocean and the restaurant has floor to ceiling windows so you can watch the sun setting over the ocean. Beautiful.

14. Drive from Punakaiki to Greymouth (about 30 minutes). Drop your car off then catch the Tranz Alpine train to Christchurch. Along with Milford Sound, this is one of the “must do” things in NZ. The train takes about 4 hours to go from Greymouth on the West Coast to Christchurch on the East Coast, and travels through the alps. Have your camera ready, sit back and enjoy a wine, and watch the world go by. A taste of New Zealand rail travel is a wonderful way to finish your holiday.

 

International Freight Forwarding and Shipping

International freight shipping is a complex procedure that requires the services of an international freight forwarder.

A freight forwarder is essentially a company or a person whose duties are to organize shipments of corporations or individuals, and to get large orders from manufacturers to the market or to the final point of distribution.

Freight forwarders contract carriers to facilitate the shipment of goods. The forwarder himself is not a carrier per se, but is skilled in supply chain management. Basically, these forwarders can be thought of as a travel agency for the cargo industry or as a third party logistics provider.

Freight can be booked for a whole host of carrier types, which include ships, trucks, planes and railroads. Some shipments can use multiple carrier types on route before it reaches its designated destination.

Freight shipping calls for very specific documentation as it has to go through multiple custom checks before being allowed to pass through. The forwarder would organize the carriage of your international shipment, along with helping the handling and processing of all the necessary paperwork. International forwarders also make sure that your shipment is arriving at the correct place at the specified time.

An international freight forwarder should traditionally guide you through the complicated process of international shipping, as they are the experts on the international freight shipping process. This way you can understand and aid your shipment and your freight forwarding company can benefit from this information.

A day in the life of a freight forwarder would consist of the following tasks:

The primary task of a forwarder at work would be conversations and negotiations with clients and warehouses that they deal with worldwide. This is because they need to gather information for the purpose of passing it on to the concerned parties that they are doing business with or need to report to as authorities. These would include an SSL – Steam Ship Line, the United States Customs or they might even be the customer themselves.

Other tasks include ensuring that the freight being imported or exported by the client always gains entry into the country it is being forwarded to. The forwarder must always arrange for the freight in question to be picked up and delivered to the consignee’s final place of business.

This would mean being in constant contact with trucking companies and rail lines to ensure that everything is operational and will reach the assigned designation in time.

With the advent of modern communication technology these tasks are relatively easier for the modern freight forwarder, which means that today, a typical forwarder would like most professionals, spend his day in front of a computer, where he controls and tracks the freights processing and progress.

 

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